crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

crusherccme:

found this gem in the 1996 Cornell Women’s Handbook. it’s what to say when a guy tries to get out of using a condom

got tagged by buckingforbucky for an ipod shuffle thing so..

not tagging anyone but these are fun

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Okay this is a way too polarized comic strip and this subject is seriously not that clear-cut and this attitude needs to stop.
If someone is literally suffering from clinical depression, they are allowed to say, “I do not feel like hanging out today, I am too depressed. I’m sorry.” That is an appropriate descriptor. If someone literally has a panic disorder, they can say, “you almost gave me a panic attack.” If someone gets really close to triggering someone, it is in fact within their right, and entirely not ableist for them to say such a thing.
If someone literally has insomnia, and stay up way later than desired, they are allowed to say, when they go to bed at 1 and need to be up by 5, “I stayed up until 1 AM, my insomnia is so bad!” They are correct. The disorder is appropriately, in the case, an adjective.
Anorexia itself is not a mental disorder despite being used interchangeably with one. It is a symptom. It is a scientific term. It is decreased appetite for a prolonged period of time. Anorexia Nervosa is a mental disorder with the chief defining characteristic being the symptom, anorexia. Offensive as it may be when totally unwarranted and uncalled for and used pejoratively (and I know quite well, my dad quite liberally uses the term in reference to me if I lose like two pounds), it is an actual descriptor. If you are say, a cancer patient, and your doctor says, “you look so anorexic,” because you haven’t been eating because you feel like literal trash and food is just really unappealing right now, it is in fact an accurate description. The doctor will probably prescribe something for that.
On final note, if I, a literally OCD person, want to make light of my situation, I am entitled to use my OCD as an adjective, thanks. If I’m doing something blatantly OCD like refusing to drink out of a glass with mineral build up on the bottom because I know there’s a very real possibility that I’ll throw up and that will be far more embarrassing than refusing a perfectly good glass, or my OCD driven comorbid ARFID eating bullshit becoming super obvious when I pick the onions individually out of my food and make a small onion mountain on the side of my plate because of the texture, and whoever is with me is looking at me like I’m, “psycho,” I’m allowed to be like, “haha looks like my OCD is coming out again,” to kind of ease the silent, “what in the ungodly fuck are you doing,” tension.
There are completely inappropriate uses of mental disorders like adjectives, obviously, like casual use of mental illness to describe mere quirks, or stigmatization like, “stop being so ODC,” when someone does something vaguely tidy, or someone being sad one day and someone going, “ugh you’re so depressing,” and casual misuse is definitely trivialising because it’s definitely contributing to casual ableism and what I’m going to call ableism culture (because let’s face it it’s widespread and normalized). However, it’s not misuse if you have the damned thing and defining mental illness as invariably inappropriate for usage as an adjective is definitely just further silencing people with mental illness. It is not that straightforward and making it so is legitimately depriving people with mental illness the ability to use their mental illness as a reason for why they’re doing something caused by that mental illness and rigidity on this subject is going to do more harm than good.
"Don’t use mental illness descriptors if you don’t have the mental illness," is a lot more accommodating to people who need those descriptors than, "MENTAL DISORDERS ARE NOT ADJECTIVES."

Okay this is a way too polarized comic strip and this subject is seriously not that clear-cut and this attitude needs to stop.

If someone is literally suffering from clinical depression, they are allowed to say, “I do not feel like hanging out today, I am too depressed. I’m sorry.” That is an appropriate descriptor.

If someone literally has a panic disorder, they can say, “you almost gave me a panic attack.” If someone gets really close to triggering someone, it is in fact within their right, and entirely not ableist for them to say such a thing.

If someone literally has insomnia, and stay up way later than desired, they are allowed to say, when they go to bed at 1 and need to be up by 5, “I stayed up until 1 AM, my insomnia is so bad!” They are correct. The disorder is appropriately, in the case, an adjective.

Anorexia itself is not a mental disorder despite being used interchangeably with one. It is a symptom. It is a scientific term. It is decreased appetite for a prolonged period of time. Anorexia Nervosa is a mental disorder with the chief defining characteristic being the symptom, anorexia. Offensive as it may be when totally unwarranted and uncalled for and used pejoratively (and I know quite well, my dad quite liberally uses the term in reference to me if I lose like two pounds), it is an actual descriptor. If you are say, a cancer patient, and your doctor says, “you look so anorexic,” because you haven’t been eating because you feel like literal trash and food is just really unappealing right now, it is in fact an accurate description. The doctor will probably prescribe something for that.

On final note, if I, a literally OCD person, want to make light of my situation, I am entitled to use my OCD as an adjective, thanks. If I’m doing something blatantly OCD like refusing to drink out of a glass with mineral build up on the bottom because I know there’s a very real possibility that I’ll throw up and that will be far more embarrassing than refusing a perfectly good glass, or my OCD driven comorbid ARFID eating bullshit becoming super obvious when I pick the onions individually out of my food and make a small onion mountain on the side of my plate because of the texture, and whoever is with me is looking at me like I’m, “psycho,” I’m allowed to be like, “haha looks like my OCD is coming out again,” to kind of ease the silent, “what in the ungodly fuck are you doing,” tension.

There are completely inappropriate uses of mental disorders like adjectives, obviously, like casual use of mental illness to describe mere quirks, or stigmatization like, “stop being so ODC,” when someone does something vaguely tidy, or someone being sad one day and someone going, “ugh you’re so depressing,” and casual misuse is definitely trivialising because it’s definitely contributing to casual ableism and what I’m going to call ableism culture (because let’s face it it’s widespread and normalized). However, it’s not misuse if you have the damned thing and defining mental illness as invariably inappropriate for usage as an adjective is definitely just further silencing people with mental illness. It is not that straightforward and making it so is legitimately depriving people with mental illness the ability to use their mental illness as a reason for why they’re doing something caused by that mental illness and rigidity on this subject is going to do more harm than good.

"Don’t use mental illness descriptors if you don’t have the mental illness," is a lot more accommodating to people who need those descriptors than, "MENTAL DISORDERS ARE NOT ADJECTIVES."

the-elderscrolls:

Polish doctor that refused to perform abortion named a “hero”
Dr Bogdan Chazan was visited by an expecting mother (32 weeks into pregnancy), who already had 5 miscarriages before and was worried about her health. It turned out that the fetus had hydrocephalus, undeveloped brain and was missing many bones from its skull. The Doctor refused to perform an abortion and didn’t send the woman to another hospital which could do so (according to polish law, if a doctor doesn’t want to perform an abortion, he has to choose another hospital which will agree to do so). Chazan was named a “local hero” and “true warrior of Jesus in the name of life of the unborn” by many polish politicians and catholic activists. He used conscience clause as an excuse for his actions.
The woman gave birth to the child through a C-section. She and her husband spent 10 painful days watching their deformed child die a horrible death. When she finally decided to speak out, she said:
“During these 10 days, no priest, no pro life activist or even dr Chazan came to see the child, to ask if they can help. It was really hard to look at our child. We knew what was coming, but it was still very hard to cope with”
Congratulations, pro-lifers - another “life” saved, another “happy” child and “happy” family. 

the-elderscrolls:

Polish doctor that refused to perform abortion named a “hero”

Dr Bogdan Chazan was visited by an expecting mother (32 weeks into pregnancy), who already had 5 miscarriages before and was worried about her health. It turned out that the fetus had hydrocephalus, undeveloped brain and was missing many bones from its skull. The Doctor refused to perform an abortion and didn’t send the woman to another hospital which could do so (according to polish law, if a doctor doesn’t want to perform an abortion, he has to choose another hospital which will agree to do so). Chazan was named a “local hero” and “true warrior of Jesus in the name of life of the unborn” by many polish politicians and catholic activists. He used conscience clause as an excuse for his actions.

The woman gave birth to the child through a C-section. She and her husband spent 10 painful days watching their deformed child die a horrible death. When she finally decided to speak out, she said:

During these 10 days, no priest, no pro life activist or even dr Chazan came to see the child, to ask if they can help. It was really hard to look at our child. We knew what was coming, but it was still very hard to cope with

Congratulations, pro-lifers - another “life” saved, another “happy” child and “happy” family. 

ohawkguy:

the notebook problem: you see a notebook. you want to buy the notebook. but you know you have like TEN OTHER NOTEBOOKS. most which are STILL EMPTY. you don’t need to notebook. you’re probably not gonna use the notebook anyway. what’s the point? DONT BUY THE NOTEBOOK. you buy the notebook.

fennecfenris:

skyrim doesnt belong to the nords

skyrim doesnt belong to the dunmer

skyrim doesnt belong to any race

skyrim belongs to me

i bought that game

its mine

i feel like the fact that my favourite music videos are fall out boy’s a little less sixteen candles a little more touch me and calabrese’s the dead don’t rise says a lot about me as a person

i have horrible taste in music videos

jesseplnkmvn:

today i was in hot topic with my mom and there was a bra with Simba on it so I asked her “want a lion king bra?” she said “why would i?” so I put it in front of my chest and said “hakuna ma tatas” she had to leave the store she was laughing so hard.

lanashiftdelrey:

coming out of your room at 3 am and seeing your parents

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